Frittata

Frittatas are a sometimes thing. I had in my mind that I made them often, but in looking back over the past two years, I found I’ve made them often only recently. See, when I think of a frittata I think of it as a big deal and a lot to eat.
Not true.
Not a big deal.
Not a lot to eat, especially if it is a two-egger.

I made a very special frittata in April of 2010,  but then not again until last September, when I made this one:

f_ingredients_1a

The beauty of the beast is that you can put almost anything in it; in this case, potato salad, green beans and sausage. And there are only dribs and drabs of each.

f_cooking_1bHere it is cooking on the stove for about 9 minutes over really low heat until it is not shaky, but the top is still wet. Grate some cheese on top. We fix the wet top under the broiler for 3 or four minutes and at the same time, cheese melts and eggs puff and it gets all yummy looking.

f_eat_it_1c

My frittata is a 2 or 3 egg frittata, made only for me — C eats traditional breakfasts — and is generated Saturday or Sunday morning, inspired by bits of leftovers. I cook it in my Le Creuset 6 inch skillet, the perfect vessel to heat evenly, hold the heat and go into the broiler.

cherry tomato and potato frittata

cherry tomato and potato frittata

And so, just last week a carrot two-egger with a leftover fish fillet… first time I’ve tried something like that.

leftover carrots that were poached in orange juice, butter and white wine

leftover carrots that were poached in orange juice, butter and white wine

I plopped a hunk of leftover fish in the center and poured the eggs around it. Those white blobby things are bits of Spring Hill Farms fresh curd cheese.

I plopped a hunk of leftover fish in the center and poured the eggs around it. Those white blobby things are bits of Spring Hill Farms fresh curd cheese.

f_eat_3d

Good and Good.

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6 thoughts on “Frittata

  1. …so what’s the difference between a Fritatta and an omelet? Besides the folding…

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  2. Eric,
    Everything is different except the ingredients.
    An omelet is cooked thin over direct heat, then “filled” and folded, as you say.
    In a frittata, eggs cover the fillings, cook very slowly, undisturbed and are finished by broiling.
    And the taste and texture is very different. Make your own — using the exact same ingredients — and see for yourself.

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  3. I made a fritatta last night. Picture coming…

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  4. Yes, it can be a delicious way to use leftovers. Very popular in my house when thinking “What’s for dinner?” with 2 little dudes after a long day at work. Needless to say, it all depends on the leftovers!

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  5. Will the frittata be ruined substituting egg whites for one of the eggs?

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  6. I’ve loved fritatas for years. Another will be coming up as soon as I restock the leftovers in my fridge. We faced an empty fridge after a 3 week trip to Vietnam and Cambodia (where I picked up more yummy eating ideas) but bought snowpeas, cabbage and mini-Yukon Golds at the market today.

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